GIM   >>   News   >>   "In today's dynamic world, we need innovators and problem solvers. So, be ready to experiment, create and do the unimaginable," says Prof. Meena Parulekar, Assistant Professor (Adjunct) at Goa Institute of Management

"In today's dynamic world, we need innovators and problem solvers. So, be ready to experiment, create and do the unimaginable," says Prof. Meena Parulekar, Assistant Professor (Adjunct) at Goa Institute of Management

At Goa Institute of Management (GIM), management learning never stops! In a free-wheeling interview, Professor Meena Parulekar, herself a PGDBM alum and now an Assistant Professor (Adjunct) at GIM, talks about how the holistic learning process helps students hit the shop floor running begin their professional careers.

What does a management degree at GIM teach students? What did it teach you?

It’s not just about the degree; it’s the kind of experience a student gets at GIM that goes a long way in shaping his/her career path. To make a mark in his/her career, a student really needs to understand that in managing people and, in turn, organisations, a holistic perspective is required. I think this is precisely what GIM taught me.

What are the major changes that GIM has made since you were there and how have these changes helped management aspirants?

In terms of Infrastructure and facilities, the changes have been phenomenal. From technology-enabled classrooms and a modern library to state-of-the-art recreational facilities, GIM has it all. The focus on quality, holistic education remains as the faculty is constantly upgrading and training itself to meet the ever-increasing demands of a changing industry.

What are you trying to do differently as far as the classroom learning experience is concerned? 

One of the most important things that comes to mind is that students of today want quick solutions. They love solving problems; but unlike in the past when they just read about them, they now want to experience them. This is what we try to do when we introduce them to the healthcare sector in Goa – we focus on showing them, at close quarters, how the many aspects of healthcare are delivered.

Any advice for PGDM aspirants?

Keep your mind open and flexible to change. We really do not need managers or employees. In today’s dynamic world, we need innovators and problem solvers. So, be ready to experiment, create and do the unimaginable.

Has the course programme you teach been designed in keeping with the latest trends in the industry?

Yes, of course! I take courses in Quality Management, Regulatory Compliance for Pharmaceuticals, Supply Chain in Healthcare and Managing Research and Development in Healthcare. We also invite practitioners in the field to deliver interactive sessions to our students so that the learning process is enhanced.

What innovative strategies do you employ to keep things interesting for students? 

Every class is a new experiment and based on how the course went the last time. I keep devising new ways to improve student engagement. This could be through the use of role plays, making a poster based on a field visit experience, having a debate or discussion in the class or the use of case studies that a student can relate to. 

How crucial are case studies and presentations?

I think case studies and presentations are a must. They force students to think, read and act on their own analyses. This is necessary because in the real world they will have to work on facts and arrive at decisions themselves. Management education is not only about academic learning, it is also about the holistic development of the individual.